“Most prominent among Nordling’s talents is a knack for letting one hear just what is important. He attends to balances with unfailing effectiveness.”

- Peninsula Times Tribune

"Nordling conducts in a precise, particular fashion and that's how the Bay Chamber Symphony plays. He makes no exorbitant gestures. With a light beat, he elicits balanced, satisfying performances. For the Beethoven, it wan't about 45 people trying to sound like 90 but 45 making the Fourth Symphony sound as if it were the scale of ensemble Beethoven had in mind."

- San Francisco Chronicle

"All of the musicians performed expressively... Not only stimulating the ears, their offer of a beautiful tapestry of instrumental voices also spoke to the heart. Certainly wishing to make the most out of this opportunity, the audience was rapt throughout the whole performance... The energetic and expressive display by Robert Nordling in conducting the orchestra was a thrill to witness. Nordling’s arms moved about with such energy... his eyes opened wide, shining with enthusiasm."

- Bandung Pikiran Rakyat, Indonesia

“Nordling has a fine ear for balance and color and effortlessly draws a full, legato tone from the strings.”

- David Lockington, Music Director, Pasadena Symphony

“Nordling crowned his concert with a probing, hauntingly beautiful performance of Bartok’s “Music for Strings, Percussion and Celeste.”

- Byron Belt - Syndicated Columnist

“I found Mr. Nordling an excellent musician and conductor with a good command of the music and a well-developed sense of working with the orchestral ensemble. He has a future in the music world.”

- Michael Tilson Thomas

"There was a fresh and airy quality and a certain elegance, everything poised and dance-like, never driven, but rather more heavily made and importantly symphonic. The bright tempos Beethoven specified but that are now traditionally slowed down for bigger orchestras and halls, worked for Nordling, to the advantage of the springier, implicitly livelier effect. This is so not because of his ensemble's size as such, but because Nordling knows what he's after and gets it. It's a question of getting all relationships and balances just right."

- Robert Commanday - Music Critic, San Francisco Chronicle

 

“The energetic and expressive display by Robert Nordling in conducting the orchestra was a thrill to witness. Keeping eye contact with all members of the orchestra…, Nordling’s arms moved about with such energy … For certain movements, especially throughout the uptempo sequences, his eyes opened wide, shining with enthusiasm.”

Bandung Pikiran Rakyat - Satira Yudatama

Bandung, Indonesia

 

Full Reviews

 

San Mateo Times - Joseph Valicenti

The Bay Chamber Symphony Orchestra presented an all-string program Sunday at the college of San Mateo.

Featuring works by Elgar, JS Bach, Grieg and concertmaster Joseph Edelberg, music director Robert Nordling kept the entire program in fine balance and created some wonderful effects.

From the opening measures of the first work, Elgar’s Introduction and allegro for Strings’ it was obvious that Nordling’ had his own highly personalized conception of the score in mind. This included an intense drive in the more impassioned sections and a singing lyric quality in the contrasted expressive ones.

Even though this is music that is highly accessible and even familiar sounding, Nordling kept his interpretation from sounding trite or condescending. He also affected a good balance between the quartet of strings that formed the concertato group and the rest of the orchestra.

Times Tribune – Michael Andrews

Nordling and his band of 40 continue to give Peninsula music clovers top-notch performances of small orchestra repertoire. They played the latest winner on Saturday evening.

Most prominent among Nordling's talents is a knack for letting one hear just what is important. He tends to balances with unfailing effectiveness. Schubert’s “Overture in the Italian Style” provides a case in point, with its reliance on woodwinds in various numbers and combinations to carry main ideas against an often busy background of strings.

Even more impressive in terms of clarity was the Bartok “Music for Strings Percussion and Celeste” in a genuine and rarely heard chamber rendition like the original. All lines of the great opening fugue could be followed readily.

San Francisco Chronicle – Marilyn Tucker

For those who thought that the last thing the Bay Area needed was another chamber orchestra, there exists in San Mateo the Bay chamber Symphony Orchestra, now in its second season and playing up a storm.

Advance reports had promised an orchestra of considerable worth. Still I was hardly prepared to be almost knocked out of my seat by the emphatic downbeat and lush string sound that followed in Elgar’s Introduction and Allegro for Strings and String Quartet. Nordling brought it to a dramatic, even vivid, pace, and the clarity of voices was outstanding.

San Francisco Chronicle - Robert Commanday

"Bay Chamber Symphony and Soloist Shine"

Fortunately, there's no indication of any mergers among the area's several chamber orchestras as some have advocated. The Bay chamber Symphony under Robert Nordling on Saturday at the College of Notre Dame, in Belmont, gave the most recent demonstration why conglomeration of forces would not be a salutary idea.

Nordling's orchestra serves its own Peninsula audience with select programs and soloists - the weekend's offering consisting of Ravel's "Le Tombeau de Couperin," Mozart's Piano Concerto in G, K. 453, with a fine young soloist, Christopher O'Riley, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 4. The performances were musical, stylish and tasteful, reflecting Nordling's qualities. It's the conductor who makes one orchestra different from another because their personnel, drawn from one pool of professional players, are to a noticeable extent, shared.

Nordling conducts in a precise, particular fashion and that's how the Bay Chamber Symphony plays. He makes no exorbitant gestures. With a light beat, he elicits balanced, satisfying performances. For the Beethoven, it wan't about 45 people trying to sound like 90 but 45 making the Fourth Symphony sound as if it were the scale of ensemble Beethoven had in mind.

There was a fresh and airy quality and a certain elegance, everything poised and dance-like, never driven, but rather more heavily made and importantly symphonic. The bright tempos Beethoven specified but that are now traditionally slowed down for bigger orchestras and halls, worked for Nordling, to the advantage of the springier, implicitly livelier effect. This is so not because of his ensemble's size as such, but because Nordling knows what he's after and gets it. It's a question of getting all relationships and balances just right in a scale of performance very different from the aural memory of the piece and of the Beethoven that he, the players and the listeners have carried around for years.

The chamber orchestra ensemble is naturally right for Ravel's "Le Tombeau de Couperin," which is not symphonic to begin with. The performance was refined, expressive in Ravel's elevated manner, affectionate and deft. Deborah Shidler conveyed the important oboe lead with grace.

There are sensitive touches, poetic hesitations and breaths waiting for Nordling to explore when more experience gives him confidence. The same was true of certain hardly definable nuances in the Mozart G major Concerto that are to be discovered by O'Riley as he grows in this work and with other Mozart.

Bandung Pikiran Rakyat - Satira Yudatama

"A Highly Motivated Performance"

Placement of musicians plays an important role in creating an optimal harmony of sounds coming out from all the different instruments in an orchestra. If applied continuously, a certain formation will be beneficial to the development of technical skills as well as hone the instinct among the orchestra members to understand each other more.
 
While many orchestras still experience a lot of changes as regards to their personnel, Bandung Philharmonic has come up with a fixed formation, including the Director of Music Robert Nordling, hailing from New Jersey, USA.
 
Starting from the audition process, the personnel of Bandung Philharmonic has strived to exist among the classical music scene in Bandung, or even nationwide. This wish to create a sweet first impression was so strong that all the musicians performed with such motivation at the Inaugural Concert of the Bandung Philharmonic, at Padepokan Seni Mayang Sunda, Jalan Peta, Bandung, on Monday (18/1/2016).
 
All of the musicians performed expressively, at times they even closed their eyes. Not only stimulating the ears, their offer of a beautiful tapestry of instrumental voices also spoke to the heart. Certainly wishing to make the most out of this opportunity, the audience was rapt throughout the whole performance.
 
The musicians, relaxed though they seemed even since the beginning of the performance, were able to cautiously play with the emotion, channeling this determination but without trying too hard at it. Some of the personnel had had experiences performing in front of a big audience, but, as demonstrated by this excellent display of the Bandung Philharmonic, they certainly had prepared themselves well both technically and mentally.
 
Aside from performing with a full formation, Bandung Philharmonic also offered a variation in the form of two small groups, namely a quartet and a quintet, playing on stage without the conductor. The bond between the musicians was palpable as they often exchanged looks with each others, and used a heaving breath as a signal.
 
The energetic and expressive display by Robert Nordling in conducting the orchestra was a thrill to witness. Keeping eye contact with all members of the orchestra, which were arranged in a semicircle, Nordling’s arms moved about with such energy matched by his frequently bobbing head. For certain movements, especially throughout the uptempo sequences, his eyes opened wide, shining with enthusiasm.
 
Works by great composers in the history of music, such as Fantasia in F Minor, String Quartet Op. 18 No. 6, Enigma, Melati Suci, and Halo-halo Bandung, were played charmingly. For the works of overseas composers Nordling did not use any music sheet, showing his deep mastery of the compositions. And for the Indonesian compositions, he glanced at time at the music sheets but performed with such totality.
 
“Representing the diversity of identities present in the group, we intentionally brought a combination of the west and the east. We are here proving that diversity can be the source of great, beautiful things, for everyone,” said Nordling during a break between compositions.
 
He did not deny that differences in opinions or in thinking might lead to a friction that could trigger anger, or even enmity. However, that is not how differences should be resolved. Using the analogy of the harmony of sounds from all the instruments present in an orchestra, Nordling urged everyone to perceive all the differences they see as a richness to appreciate.
 
Joining the Bandung Philharmonic was a true honor and an important professional step for Nordling. He said that what he felt at that time was beyond the capacity of words to describe. His motivation to deliver his utmost was even strengthened by the response of the American public that had shown interest in this new endeavor that is the Bandung Philharmonic. “I received many many phone calls, and messages from social media from fellow musicians, also ordinary US citizens that were asking me about the activities and development of this group,” he added.
 
Audition
One of the founders of the Bandung Philharmonic, Airin Efferin, noted that all 27 members of the orchestra were selected by merit. They were musicians whom the judges decided to be most suitable to fill the roles. But these musicians, who had to participate in a blind audition, were not simply proficient technically, but also had considerable experience with respect to teamwork. “There were some musicians who were technically better at music than the ones we ended up selecting, but in the end the judges decided otherwise,” said Airin.
 
Four judges, namely Robert Nordling, Michael Hall (Educational Programs Director of Bandung Philharmonic), Eric Awuy, and Danny Ceri, handpicked the members from about 150 applicants from all around Indonesia. The audition took place on 13-15 January 2016. (Satira Yudatama/PR)